Exclusive: Colt Cabana Speaks About The Ruling, CM Punk, More

Colt Cabana will face no issues from the controversial podcast that discussed his friend CM Punk's exit way back in 2014.

Cabana and Punk were sued by WWE doctor Chris Amann, who alleged defamation in two 2014 episodes of the Art of Wrestling Podcast, and sought nearly $4 million from the duo. After several days, Tuesday saw closing arguments, and a verdict in favor of Cabana and Punk. Shortly after the ruling, the host of the show, Cabana spoke to Fightful.com.

"I felt confident throughout this whole thing, but my lawyer told me very early, you just never know. A jury could feel this way one day. At the end of the day, the jury came to the right decision, the decision we all felt was obvious. I feel great. It's all hopefully done, I can get this out of my life. I don't have a lot of negativity in my life, and this was bringing a lot of stress. It's the worst. It's always on your mind, you're always thinking about it. It's upsetting that the system takes so long, but you have to deal with it. I remember being 34 when it started. Me being 38, it's so long that it's going to be wrapped up," said Cabana.

When Fightful's Steven Muehlhausen asked the Ring of Honor color commentator what he learned about himself during this process, Cabana admitted he learned more about the process of the court system.

"I never said to myself 'Have I done something wrong? Have I done something bad?' I always knew that was Punk's story and he wanted to tell it, and I didn't think there was anything wrong with that," Cabana said.

Cabana, with a smile, also encouraged fellow podcasters to get insured in the event that a situation like this arises. In addition to the financial concerns that the largely independent wrestler in Cabana faced, he said that Punk's newfound post-WWE freedom was compromised as well.

"When he was done with the podcast that we did, all this weight was off his chest. Now it gets sucked right back into it. It's a court case, all this money. I knew the sense of relief he felt when he was done, so I had a good sense of the relief he felt when he was done with this case," said Cabana.

Colt went on to close by saying he felt validated that a jury of his peers ruled in his favor.

From The Web